Marshall Sutherland
  
Matt Stoller on Modern Monopolies | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

Matt Stoller of the Open Market Institute talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the growing influence of Google, Facebook, and Amazon on commercial and political life. Stoller argues that these large firms have too much power over our options as consumers and creators as well as having a large impact on our access to information.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Free Speech Online

Will Duffield joins us this week to talk about the freedom of speech in the internet era. How has the shift to digital communication changed interpretations of the First Amendment?

We discuss the implications of lower barriers to entry for ownership of the mechanisms for distribution of speech, draw a distinction between speech gatekeepers and speech enablers, think about whether big web companies are beginning to act like states, and have a conversation about “fake news.”
Marshall Sutherland
  
Peak ProsperityPeak Prosperity wrote the following post Sun, 24 Dec 2017 13:03:37 -0500
David Collum: The Vicious Cycle Approaches
David Collum: The Vicious Cycle Approaches

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Whether or not you've had time yet to plow your way through David Collum's excellent 2017 Year in Review, our annual podcast with Dave always brings additional color to light -- and this year's is no exception.
Marshall Sutherland
  
The Anti-Male Trend: Dr. Helen Smith on stopping the fashionable male-bashing

Welcome to HumanLab: The Science Between Us, with Amy Alkon interviewing the luminaries of therapy and behavioral science.

This is not just a show for and about men but a show for anyone who cares about equal rights and fairness for all.

Tonight's guest is psychologist Dr. Helen Smith talking about how, in America, it's become permissible -- and even fashionable -- to be anti-male and what men can (and must) do to start changing this.

What men have been doing is going on strike -- dropping out of college, leaving the workforce, and avoiding marriage and fatherhood in droves.

There are countless articles sneering at the man who is more man-child than grownup, but Smith, in her book, Men on Strike: Why Men Are Boycotting Marriage, Fatherhood, and the American Dream - and Why It Matters, contends that men aren't dropping out because they're stuck in arrested development; they are responding rationally to the lack of incentive they see in becoming fathers, husbands, and providers.

On this show, Smith will lay out the problems -- including shocking discrimination against men such as rampant paternity fraud, condoned and even encouraged by the government -- and what she sees as steps toward solutions, for men in general and for the individual man.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Tim Harford on Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy

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Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford's latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn't save quite as much time as you'd think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.
Marshall Sutherland
  
An excellent conversation. For me a highlight was talking about how the "healthcare debate" in the US isn't about healthcare, it is about paying for healthcare, but unless we change how we deal with chronic health condition, it is all moot. It won't matter how we pay for it because we, as a nation, can't afford to pay for the exponential rise in cases and costs of chronic health care. In rough numbers, a type-2 diabetic can expect to rack up $1 million in healthcare expenses for diabetes and diabetes complications in their lifetime. There are an estimated 100 million diabetic and pre-diabetic people in the country. This has unsustainable written all over it. And that is just type-2 diabetes.

Episode 376 – Chris Kresser – Unconventional Medicine
Episode 376 – Chris Kresser – Unconventional Medicine

This week we have my good friend Chris Kresser on the show. Chris is a well known leader in the fields of ancestral health, Paleo nutrition, functional and integrative medicine, and one of the smartest guys I know.

Listen in as we chat about functional medicine, the state of health care, eliminating chronic disease, and Chris’s new book Unconventional Medicine.

Download Episode Here (MP3)

Websites:
https://chriskresser.com
https://kresserinstitute.com/
https://ccfmed.com/

Social Media:
Twitter: @ChrisKresser
Facebook: Chris Kresser L.Ac

Check out and pre-order the book Unconventional Medicine here (releases Nov 7th)

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Marshall Sutherland
  
Washington's Five Tricks

David Schoenbrod shares five specific tricks that politicians from both parties use to avoid public accountability. Is Washington more broken than people think?

How can we more properly align our elected representatives’ incentives to keep them accountable? Does Congress have the willpower to change the rules of the game?


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Marshall Sutherland
  
Excellent discussion!

Megan McArdle on Internet Shaming and Online Mobs

Author and journalist Megan McArdle of Bloomberg View talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how the internet has allowed a new kind of shaming via social media and how episodes of bad behavior live on because Google's memory is very, very good. McArdle discusses the implications this new reality has on how we behave at work and how people protect and maintain their reputations in a world where nothing is forgotten and seemingly little is forgiven.


The article (which I haven't read yet) which prompted the above discussion:

We Live in Fear of the Online Mobs

Internet shaming spreads everywhere and lives forever. We need a way to fight it.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Peak ProsperityPeak Prosperity wrote the following post Mon, 09 Oct 2017 17:10:47 -0400
Connor Stedman: Carbon Farming
Connor Stedman: Carbon Farming

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Climate change remains a hotly debated topic. But a scientific fact not up for dispute is the pronounced spike in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere over the past two centuries.

There's a building urgency to find solutions that can manage/reverse that spike -- a process known as carbon sequestration. But how to do that on a planetary scale? It's a massive predicament. And most of the 'solutions' being proposed are technologically unproven, prohibitively costly and/or completely impractical.

Enter carbon farming. It uses nature-based farming practices to park gigatons of carbon in the soil, rebuild soil health and complexity, and revitalize the nutrient density of the foods that we eat.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Tim O'Reilly on What's the Future

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Author Tim O'Reilly, founder of O'Reilly Media and long-time observer and commenter on the internet and technology, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, WTF? What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us. O'Reilly surveys the evolution of the internet, the key companies that have prospered from it, and how the products of those companies have changed our lives. He then turns to the future and explains why he is an optimist and what can be done to make that optimism accurate.
Marshall Sutherland
  
I finished listening to this today. It gives a nice overview of what sort of solutions are out there from rechargeable lithium battery LED flashlights to whole house systems.

Peak ProsperityPeak Prosperity wrote the following post Sun, 24 Sep 2017 13:20:47 -0400
Chaz Peling: Backup Power Solutions
Chaz Peling: Backup Power Solutions

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Without electricity, our capability to conduct our modern way of life becomes immediately and severely curtailed. Communication instantly stops. Food quickly spoils. Sundown puts an end to all activity. Air conditioning and water well pumps no longer function.

And as prolonged blackouts often go hand-in-hand with gas shortages, disaster victims are often truly forced into a "dark ages" lifestyle.

This week, Chaz Peling, founder of Sol Solutions, joins the podcast to share his expertise on residential backup power options. The good news is that recent technology advancements offer more robust and affordable solutions than ever before. The bad news is, you have to invest the effort to procure an install them in advance of the next crisis for them to be of use.

Join the conversation »

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Marshall Sutherland
  
Ten Things Political Scientists Know that You Don’t

Hans Noel joins us this week to share ten insights into how politics, campaigns, and political parties work.

Is there such a thing as “the will of the people?” Why do political parties act the way they do? We also discuss Duverger’s Law, campaign finance, presidential elections, special interests, and grassroots movements.

Based on an article written by the guest, in the show notes.
Marshall Sutherland
  last edited: Wed, 27 Sep 2017 07:17:51 -0400  
I haven't listened to this yet, but I recall some interest in an earlier direct primary healthcare repost I had made, so here you go...

Episode 373 – Dr. Brandon Alleman – Direct Primary Healthcare
Episode 373 – Dr. Brandon Alleman – Direct Primary Healthcare

On this episode of the podcast my guest is Dr. Brandon Alleman, MD, PhD. Dr. Alleman graduated from Hope College with a BS in Mathematics and a BA in Physics. He is a former Fulbright Scholar to Budapest, Hungary and graduated from the University of Iowa with his MD and PhD in Translational Biomedicine. He is a graduate of the Via Christi Family Medicine Residency and was the Chief Resident for obstetrics.

Listen in as we talk about the model of Direct Primary Healthcare, insurance, and problems and solutions that doctors and patients are facing today in the healthcare world.

Download Episode Here (MP3)

Website: www.antiochmed.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AntiochMedClinic/
Twitter: @AntiochMed

Direct Primary Care listings/map: http://www.dpcfrontier.com/mapper/
(We can’t vouch for the quality of all of these clinics but they are least people with similar models.)

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Marshall Sutherland
  
It looks like the link in the original message pointed to the previous episode (372). That has been corrected in the post above.
Marshall Sutherland
  last edited: Wed, 13 Sep 2017 19:07:52 -0400  
Benedict Evans on the Future of Cars

Benedict Evans of Andreessen Horowitz talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about two important trends for the future of personal travel--the increasing number of electric cars and a world of autonomous vehicles. Evans talks about how these two trends are likely to continue and the implications for the economy, urban design, and how we live.
Marshall Sutherland
  
John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move

How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Who Elected Donald Trump?

Emily Ekins has identified five different types of voters that elected Donald Trump as president. Do these groups represent a big shift in American politics?

There is also a lot of interesting information about political polling, in general, and how it has changed over time.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Liberty Chronicles

Join host Dr. Anthony Comegna on a series of libertarian explorations into the past. Liberty Chronicles combines innovative libertarian thinking about history with specialist interviews, primary and secondary sources, and answers to listener questions.

Some of you history buffs might like this podcast series. He spends a few episodes talking about what I guess you would call his theory of history (history from below). More recent episodes have talked about colonial America.
Rex Mundi
  
Not sure where this guy is going with this podcast. If this is a pro-libertarian polemic he is on a very weird tack.

but as I did not start at the beginning maybe I am missing something
Marshall Sutherland
  
In order is probably better. He may be targeting a libertarian audience, but his message may be that history isn't as neat and tidy as you've been led to believe.
elmussol
  last edited: Sun, 27 Aug 2017 08:36:01 -0400  
Not listened to that one, but puts me in mind of the Dangerous History Podcast by ProfCJ which sounds like it comes from a similar (but slightly more so) place.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Nutritious MovementNutritious Movement wrote the following post Tue, 27 Jun 2017 09:07:37 -0400
PODCAST TRANSCRIPT EP.80: Social Media is Shaping Your Body
PODCAST TRANSCRIPT EP.80: Social Media is Shaping Your Body

Listen to this episode

“The truth is that I’d undoubtedly be distracted while walking, as well. I’d probably be reviewing e-mail as I walked, or checking my stats on the GPS app or pedometer, or tweeting about how I was checking my pedometer.”

– Wayne Curtis, from The Last Great Walk, on how long-distance, cross-country walking isn’t really feasible any more

I’m taking a social media break. A two-month-long one at that. I’m used to taking smaller breaks—like for tech-free Sundays and Screen-Free Week—but this longer break feels more significant, as social media is sort of my job. You’ve probably read (on your smartphone, via social media) that there’s this potential new category of addiction—to our smartphones and to social media. Anytime I’ve read about it (on my smartphone, via social media) I wonder, “Do I have that?” And then I quickly forget about it as I make my thumb-and-finger laps through email, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For, um, work.

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I write books (eight of them, so far) about movement and the aspects of modern living that act as casts—sometimes literally and sometimes figuratively—on how we move. Animals constantly respond to their environment (and vice versa). We’re shaped, literally, by the shape of our environment, and our shape influences the environment right back. I’ve written books on how the shape of our shoes affects the shape of our feet; and how the shape of our resting positions (chairs, chairs, couches, chairs) shapes our knees, hips, and spines; and how the distance from what we look at most (screens) shapes our eyeballs. It recently occurred to me that social media is itself a cast, in that it requires us to adopt particular physical movements and positions to use it, which means our bodies are currently being shaped by social media.

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Acknowledging that our phones are influencing our physical health isn’t super groundbreaking. “Your iPhone is Ruining Your Posture — And Your Mood,” “Text Neck is Becoming an Epidemic and Could Wreck Your Spine,” and “Digital Disabilities — Text Neck, Cellphone Elbow — Are Painful and Growing” all live on the New York Times and Washington Post websites. These articles offer general advice on cutting down usage, taking breaks, and even postural correctives to reduce the impact of these devices, all of which is great, but what happens when you perceive that to step away from a social media is to lose out on something? What happens when you associate loss—of income, connection, and community—with whatever advice you’re getting from health experts? How do you transition yourself away from relying on this, or any, cast? To me, these articles give us excellent reasons to “do less on your phone” but are missing the “how to” portion that many of us are searching for in vain (on our phones, probably).

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To me, what’s affecting our bodies so much is not the devices we’re using, but our adaptation to the relationships—to other people, our income, and information—they offer. I had a phone for years before I ever had a problem putting it down, so at least for me the issue isn’t the phone itself but what I can access on it. To talk in biological terms, we’re adapting to our phone-portal. Not only the permanent bend of our thumbs and the tensions in our chests and shoulders, but to the fact that Facebook, Instagram, Twitter are our frequently used portals for communication and often stand in for the live community we lack. How do we disconnect from our phones when it means we have to disconnect from our world as we know it?

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This question—is there a way to connect with the world, with my business, in a way that doesn’t pass through my phone-portal?—is exciting to me. My work consists primarily of creating steps to changing mindsets and lifestyles so that more movement occurs naturally, thus it’s my job to step away from social media if only to create the steps for how to do it.

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And, if I see my job to be more than a teacher—if my job, as a person, is also the doing of the things I teach—then stepping away from social media and into a new (read: old) way of connection, one that doesn’t cast our bodies so severely, serves multiple functions.

It’s key to recognize that social media is the portal for communication (and the facilitator of stiff hands and arms) because we keep using it. By using social media as a portal for my information, I’ve been demanding social media movements of both me and my social media followers. Said another way: The fact that I use social media is what makes it something I, and my followers “have to use.” I’m facilitating tight thumbs and elbows and eyeballs. I’m requiring them, even.

One of my most popular books is Whole Body Barefoot: Transitioning Well to Minimal Footwear. This book, in a (long, potentially run-on) sentence is: Your feet have lots of joints that need lots of movement to stay healthy, you’ve been wearing shoes that are still and have casted the motion of your feet, but as we’ve added thicker and stiffer footwear the world over which we walk has, alongside, become hard and potentially hazardous for your feet, so because your feet are super-weak and not adapted to terrain and because the terrain you frequent is largely unsuitable for bare feet, we need to slowly adapt your feet and the habits of how and where you walk to solve this issue. (P.S. There are more details on how to do this within the book.) I’m bringing up Whole Body Barefoot because we can use a similar approach to Transitioning Well to Minimal Social Media.

We Need a Plan

Have I mentioned that I love social media? I really do. I like social media like I love a great pair of minimal shoes (which are shoes that offer protection while simultaneously allowing lots of movement). To take this long break, I’ve had to figure out all the elements of social media (the anatomy of social media, if you will), the way I have for shoes, and decide whether each element is helpful or unhelpful to my end goal of moving more of my body, more often.

I’ll be the first to say that there are all sorts of great elements to social media alongside the not-so-great ones, and that what places these elements in the “helpful” and “not as helpful” categories depends on the individual. This list isn’t exhaustive; it’s just mine.

Helpful
  • Connection
  • Information
  • Education
  • Inspiration
  • Entertainment/Distraction
  • Business
  • Portability
  • Artistic
Not As Helpful
  • Screen time
  • Certain repetitive body movements (head, neck, spine, wrists, thumbs, eye muscles)
  • Physical isolation
  • Distraction
  • Frequency
  • Portability
My approach to my break is not “go barefoot” (i.e., get rid of all these inputs) but “change shoes” (i.e., get the helpful elements without the not-as-helpful ones). Here are the steps I’m taking to transition to a different way of connecting, alongside which of my elements of social media they address:
  • Inform your following (business or personal) about your break ahead of time, multiple times (as I did on my social media as well as my podcast), over a few months, and include why you’re doing this. In general, people wish you well. They might mourn the loss of constant access to your perspective and daily life, but that’s okay. (Connection, Information, Business.) These are some of the graphics I’ll use:
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  • Offer other ways to stay connected. My social media break is not a work break; it’s a break from the habit of doing things in a way that’s proven to be detrimental to us physically. So I’ve dusted off my old newsletter software, but not to send out the old newsletter style of yester-year—I’m offering shorter, often image-based pieces that match the style of social media. What’s the difference? I’m sending out one a week, max, so I’m not constantly on my phone, and my followers don’t have to worry that they’ll miss something if they don’t log on and do their social media laps. I also informed my followers of how I’ll be using my email outreach going forward so they know what to expect. I also ramped up and reminded my followers of my non-social-media portals of info, like my podcasts and books, and took the time to introduce my followers to each other via a social media ROLL CALL.
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If we’re removing a bit of community, then taking the time to replace it—to achieve community in another way—is helpful. (Connection, Information, Education, Inspiration, Entertainment/Distraction, Business, Artistic, reducing Frequency and Isolation.)
  • Have a plan for your hands. Many smokers will say that they’re not adapted to nicotine as much as they are to the habit of smoking—they physical practice of the ceremony of smoking. This could be one of the reasons those quitting smoking find themselves needing to put something else in their mouth. They’re used to the motions. So if you want to cut down on your phone or social media use, it might help to keep your hands busy.
There are great lists of things you can do instead of picking up your smartphone, but I’ve decided to come up with five exercises that can actually break up some of our physical adaptations to all that social media time. And P.S. Anyone can do these, social media break notwithstanding, and one of them you can actually do while you’re using your phone. (Reducing physical adaptations to repetitive positioning; adding movement.)

Head ramping (or just back your face away from your phone). Keeping your eyes on the horizon, and without lifting the chin or chest, slide your head back to the wall behind you. This is an easy adjustment that immediately increases the height of your head, decompresses the vertebrae in your neck, and stretches the small muscles in the head, neck, and upper back. SIMPLE and effective.

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Thumb stretch. Make a loose fist with your right hand with the thumb pointing up. Grasp the thumb as low as you can with your left hand and move it like it’s an old-fashioned joystick, slowly moving it toward you and side-to-side at varying angles.

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Wrist stretch. Keeping your shoulders down and relaxed, touch the backs of your hands together including the thumbs, then bring them down to waist level. Hold there or move them slowly up and down in front of your torso, or right to left. Keep those thumbs touching!

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Thoracic stretch. Place your hands on a wall, step back to bring your hips behind you, then lower your chest toward the ground stretching your shoulders.

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Nerve Stretch. Reach your hands away from you making a T with your arms and a “STOPmotion with your hands. Spreading your fingers away from each other, slowly work your fingertips toward your head. Keep your middle fingers pointing up, thumbs forward, and elbows slightly bent toward the ground. Think of reaching the upper arm bones away from you as you work your fingers back.

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In the end, it’s not my intention to force people off social media (as if I could!) but to inform you, remind you, and demonstrate to you (and to myself, always) how malleable our body, habitat, and habits are. I want to keep alive the idea, and the practice, of choice; to show that we are able to transition out of our culture’s physical casts—chairs, shoes, and Instagram—if we can break down the mental casts that accompany them.

I cannot say enough how important it is to use a stepwise approach to transitioning whenever you’re un-casting anything, and how the steps are endlessly definable by you. My big social media break at this point was facilitated by smaller transitions—for example, I moved away from forums in general, and then forums on Facebook—over a couple of years. With each transition, I find myself moving more and taking more action—literally moving more—for the topics I previously just spent time reading about and passionately discussing via social media.

Remember that time you dropped your phone (probably in the toilet) and were forced offline and found that life was different, and not all bad, once you unplugged? This break is a high-pressure environment I’m creating to facilitate (force, really) some adaptations on both a work and personal level. I suspect that, after my break, I will have adapted to some new habits and put new (read: old) systems in place that are more nourishing to me and to my followers in the end. If past transitions—like when I tossed my couch—are any indication, I’ll likely continue to do this type of “transition to minimal” for the rest of my life, delving into change when I tune in to symptoms influenced by an aspect of my environment.

I’m an 80s kid, and I feel like movies from that decade are my elders—I find quotes from them popping into my head when I need wisdom. And lately, when I think about shrugging off the cast of social media from my body, all I can think of is this scene from WarGames, where the talking computer (Siri’s grandfather) is trying to figure out the strategy necessary to win a geothermal nuclear war. The computer quickly plays itself only to deduce that no matter what the scenario, nuclear war will ultimately destroy everything. (Not to get too dramatic about this–it’s social media–but it just goes to show you that what you watch ends up part of your anatomy). The computer’s takeaway, and mine, on various matters, more and more often: “Strange game. The only winning move is not to play.”



WarGames - "The Only Winning Move"
by MovieReferences on YouTube
Marshall Sutherland
  
Robin Feldman on Drug Patents, Generics, and Drug Wars | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

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Robin Feldman of the University of California Hastings College of Law and author of Drug Wars talks about her book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman explores the various ways that pharmaceutical companies try to reduce competition from generic drugs. The conversation includes a discussion of the Hatch-Waxman Act and the sometimes crazy world of patent protection.
Marshall Sutherland
  
Thomas Ricks on Churchill and Orwell | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

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Author and historian Thomas Ricks talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Churchill and Orwell. Ricks makes the case that the odd couple of Winston Churchill and George Orwell played and play an important role in preserving individual liberty. Ricks reviews the contributions of these two giants whose lives overlapped and whose legacy remains vibrant.
Rex Mundi
  
Starred and saved for later
cer
cer
  
What that good looking guy above me said.
Rex Mundi
  
@Carolus Rex Probably ought not say things like that... I might become arrogant and vain.