Is Alzheimer’s an insulin-resistance disease?
Diet Doctor
 
Is Alzheimer’s an insulin-resistance disease?


https://vimeo.com/video/238778628


1,768 views
What is the root cause of the Alzheimer’s epidemic – and how should we intervene before the disease is fully developed?
This is the topic of psychiatrist Georgia Ede’s presentation from the Low Carb USA 2017.

Watch a part of the presentation above (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership:

Insulin and the brain – Dr. Georgia Ede

Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service.

Keto


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    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

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    Keto for beginners: How it works08:37How does a keto diet work? Learn all you need to know, in part 2 of the keto course.

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    Keto for beginners: What to eat?11:22What do you eat on a keto diet? Get the answer in part 3 of the keto course.

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    Fat Chance1:05:43Is it possible to ride a pushbike across the Australian continent (2,100 miles) without eating carbs?

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    How to make keto sustainable15:00How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible?

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    How to achieve a healthy low-carb lifestyle46:42How should you formulate a low-carb or keto diet exactly in order to maximize success? How much fat, protein and carbs should you eat?

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    Coming soon: Cooking keto with Kristie02:57Do you like food? Do you eat a low-carb or keto diet? Then we have something very special coming up for you.

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet48:32Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others.

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    How to become a fat-burning machine11:30Dr. Eric Westman explains the concepts fat-burning mode and carb-burning mode. Dr. Westman's LCHF course part 2.

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    Keto and fast food10:28Can you get low-carb food at fast-food restaurants? Ivor Cummins and Bjarte Bakke went to a number of fast-food restaurants to find out.

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    Is lower insulin the key to better brain health?46:36What is the root cause of the Alzheimer's epidemic – and how should we intervene before the disease is fully developed?

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    Do you need to check your ketones?22:19Should you measure ketones on a keto diet? Dr. Westman guides you through situations when measuring is beneficial – and when it's not.

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    Eating keto to survive cancer28:51Audra Wilford on the experience of using a ketogenic diet as part of treating her son Max’s brain tumor.

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    Challenging The Dogma16:47Dr. Priyanka Wali tried a ketogenic diet and felt great. After reviewing the science she started recommending it to patients.

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    Treating cancer with a keto diet17:07Can a strict keto diet help prevent or even treat some cancers, like brain cancer?

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    Nutritional ketosis and metabolic-based research1:05:18Dr. Dominic D'Agostino's presentation gives valuable insights into the keto research which is currently conducted across the world.

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    Making Low Carb Really Fun and Good13:24Learn how to make great keto foods with Maria Emmerich!

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    A New Life with a Keto Diet13:38If your muscles can't use stored glycogen, is it then a good idea to eat a high-carb diet to compensate for this? Or can a keto diet help treat these rare glycogen storage diseases?

Insulin


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    Weight Control – Calories or Insulin36:26Is weight loss controlled by calories in and calories out? Or is our body weight carefully regulated by hormones?

  • Image/photo

    Is obesity caused by too much insulin?25:27Is obesity mainly caused by the fat storing hormone insulin? Dr. Ted Naiman answers this question.

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    What causes insulin resistance?29:01No less than 70% of people die from chronic disease, connected to insulin resistance. Dr. Naiman explains what causes it.

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    The Pathways of Insulin Resistance30:41Are we chasing the wrong guy when it comes to heart disease? And if so, what is the real culprit in the disease?

  • Image/photo

    Hyperinsulinemia - What Insulin Does in Your Body45:29Controlling the insulin in your body can help you control both your weight and important aspects of your health. Dr. Naiman explains how.

  • Image/photo

    Why We Get Fat47:30Why do we get fat – and what can we do about it? Gary Taubes at Low Carb USA 2016.

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    The Key to Obesity44:22How insulin toxicity causes obesity and type 2 diabetes – and how to reverse it. Dr Jason Fung at the LCHF Convention 2015.

More


Keto for beginners

The post Is Alzheimer’s an insulin-resistance disease? appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Ketosis  Insulin  Dementia  About membership  Low Carb USA
New keto meal plan – family favorites
Diet Doctor
 
New keto meal plan – family favorites

Our popular keto meal-plan tool gives you everything you need to succeed on a keto low-carb diet. Meal plans, recipes and shopping lists – no planning required! Adjust, switch or skip any meal – and the recipes and shopping lists will adapt.
We now have 75 low-carb meal plans available – including keto, moderate, vegetarian, dairy-free and favorites – we’re adding at least one new plan every week.

Keto #41 - family favorites


How about a week of eating that the whole family will enjoy? Start with meatballs and continue with Tex-Mex stuffed zucchini boats for Taco Tuesday. Enjoy meals like lasagna and a chicken Philly cheesesteak casserole while staying below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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Our low-carb meal plan service is free to try out for a month

Learn more about the low-carb meal plan service

Find our latest keto meal plans below.

Top keto recipes


What is everyone else eating? Check out some of our most popular keto options that thousands of readers come back to, time after time. These tasty dishes are keto favorites for a reason:

Latest keto meal plans


Keto #41 - family favorites


How about a week of eating that the whole family will enjoy? Start with meatballs and continue with Tex-Mex stuffed zucchini boats for Taco Tuesday. Enjoy meals like lasagna and a chicken Philly cheesesteak casserole while staying below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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Keto #40 - no cooking


This week’s meal plan offers simple yet delicious meals with no cooking involved. Perfect for traveling or when you lack motivation but still want to eat keto. It will help you stay well below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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Keto #39 - Flexitarian


This week’s meal plan is made to fit a semi-vegetarian or “flexitarian” life-style. It offers vegetarian meals mixed with occasional fish, meat and poultry dishes. If you prefer all vegetarian meals, the recipes are easy to adjust by simply excluding the pepperoni, chicken and smoked salmon. You’ll enjoy hearty meals and stay below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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Keto #38 - dairy free


This week’s meal plan offers hearty dishes like crispy Chinese pork with cabbage and Buffalo chicken combined with lighter dishes such as a spicy pork and kale soup. You’ll enjoy this and much more while staying below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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Keto #37 - meals in 30 minutes or less


This week’s meal plan offers filling meals that you’ll have on the table in 30 minutes or less. How about a warm and comforting cabbage soup with chicken quenelles, a steak and broccoli stir-fry and chicken fajita bowl? You’ll have that and much more while staying below 20 grams of carbs per day. Full meal plan →


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The post New keto meal plan – family favorites appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Meal plans
Keto smoked mussels casserole
Diet Doctor
 
Keto smoked mussels casserole

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Navigating busy weeknights? Canned seafood to the rescue! Mix up some smoked mussels from your pantry with cheese and cauliflower, and have a satisfying keto dinner on the table in half an hour.

Full recipe →

The post Keto smoked mussels casserole appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Recipes
Keto smoked mussels casserole
Diet Doctor
 
Keto smoked mussels casserole

Image/photo

Navigating busy weeknights? Canned seafood to the rescue! Mix up some smoked mussels from your pantry with cheese and cauliflower, and have a satisfying keto dinner on the table in half an hour.

Full recipe →

The post Keto smoked mussels casserole appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Recipes
The keto diet: “I am over the moon right now”

Diet Doctor
 
The keto diet: “I am over the moon right now”

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Saud tried supplements, workouts and a vegetarian diet without any result on his blood sugar. Then he found keto and this is what happened in seven weeks:
I came across your website by coincidence. I am 62 years old living in Abu Dhabi, a little skinny for my height and, have been watching my HbA1c and fasting sugar for the last two years because my doctor told me so. I also know that previous medication, i.e. interferon can trigger diabetes. I have tried many supplements to block sugar and carbs, increased my workouts and gone vegetarian but my Hb1Ac kept going up and up to reach 5.9 three months ago. My doctor wanted to start me on Metformin, and I asked her to give me more time before we start.

I started an LCHF diet about seven weeks ago and today I got my HbA1c result, which is 5.4. I am over the moon right now!

I did not lose much weight much and I do not want to. I am 180 cm (5’11”) with a BMI of 22, but maybe I lost some fat around my belly. The important things are the disappearance of gas, bloating and digestive issues. It seems that my tummy did not like carbs and I was not aware.

Finally, the education you are providing is really valuable and practical. Many doctors never mention to me that carbs are in fruits and some vegetables. They just say go low on rice, pasta and potatoes. I had lots of fruits, quinoa and sweet potatoes. Now I know how to find out how many carbs are in food items. Thanks to you and Google.

All the KETO recipes from your site that I have tried are yummy and I found it easy to stick to your 20 g carbs a day.

Thank you is really not enough to express my appreciation for the work you are doing.

Best,
Saud


Comments


Congratulations to your success with keto, Saud!

Get started


Do you want to try what Saud has done? Sign up for our free 2-week keto low-carb challenge!

Alternatively, use our free keto low-carb guide, or for maximum simplicity try out our keto meal planner service with weekly delicious keto menus and shopping lists – it’s free to use for a month.


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Low carb for beginners

How to lose weight

Low-carb basics


  • Image/photo

    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

  • Image/photo

    How to eat LCHF11:18Dr. Eenfeldt on what you need to know to start eating a low-carb, high-fat diet.

  • Image/photo

    The 5 common mistakes on LCHF09:25Is it hard to reach your goal weight, are you hungry or do you feel bad? Make sure you're avoiding these mistakes.

  • Image/photo

    Is saturated fat bad?07:29Low carb is great. But could the saturated fat clog your arteries and kill you? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

  • Image/photo

    Cereal Killers1:00:07What if you could – in fact – break records without eating massive amounts of carbs?

  • Image/photo

    Everything in moderation?05:44What’s the point of low carb, shouldn’t we all just try to eat everything in moderation? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

  • Image/photo

    Living low carb with Caroline Smale07:30Caroline Smale shares her low-carb story and how she lives low carb on a daily basis.

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    How to achieve a healthy low-carb lifestyle46:42How should you formulate a low-carb or keto diet exactly in order to maximize success? How much fat, protein and carbs should you eat?

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    Fat Head Director's Cut1:46:20This movie follows stand-up comedian Tom Naughton as he tries to lose weight on a fast-food diet, to prove Morgan “Super Size Me” Spurlock wrong.

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet48:32Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others.

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    "A more pleasurable way to live"10:51Franziska Spritzler talks about what turned her into a low-carb dietitian.

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    The Cause of Obesity38:45What is the real cause of obesity? What causes weight gain? Dr. Jason Fung at Low Carb Vail 2016.

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    7 Tips to Make Low Carb Simple09:41The star of the BBC series Doctor in the House, Dr. Rangan Chatterjee, gives you seven tips that will make low carb easy.

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    Are there potential dangers with a low-carb diet?09:30Can a low-carb diet potentially be dangerous? And if so – how? Top low-carb doctors answer these questions.

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    What is the Main Benefit of Low Carb?02:52What exactly is the greatest benefit of low carb? Doctors give their top answer.

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    Why is Low Carb Important to You?04:16Why is low carb important to Dr. Rangan Chatterjee and Dr. Sarah Hallberg?

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    Q&A with Franziska Spritzler09:52Questions about how to formulate an optimal low-carb or keto diet.

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    Becoming a Low-Carb Doctor19:30How do you find a low-carb doctor? And how do we make it more simple for doctors to understand low carb?

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    Low Carb Explained32:06Almost no one knows more about the practicalities of low carb than Dr. Mary Vernon. Here she explains it for you.

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    Koncincing Kids That Kounting Kalories Is Kooky27:41Watch standup comedian Tom Naughton deliver the best talk of the 2015 Low-Carb Cruise.

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    27:26

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    Healthy Food Options – Miami Beach05:40What's a healthy diet? Here's what people say at Miami Beach.

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    Why a Low-Carb Diet and Other Questions16:59Dr. Jeffry Gerber has a long history of treating patients with low carb. What are the benefits and the concerns?

Type 2 diabetes


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    How to Reverse Diabetes Type 210:23Dr. Fung's diabetes course part 1: How do you reverse your type 2 diabetes?

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

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    The perfect treatment for diabetes and weight loss45:20Do doctors treat type 2 diabetes completely wrong today – in a way that actually makes the disease worse?

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet
 Success stories  Diabetes stories
“Why you should never eat light ice cream”

Diet Doctor
 last edited: Sun, 18 Feb 2018 08:00:17 -0500  
“Why you should never eat light ice cream”

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It’s great to see more and more people cottoning on to the fact that low-fat “light” products just are not good for you. A recent article by Business Insider references studies showing that these products hardly lead to weight loss or other health benefits.

Plus, low-fat products usually contain added sugar to make up for the bad taste once the fat has been removed. This can lead to “the insulin effect”:
You eat sugar, then you crave more.

This could happen easily with a low-fat ice cream that is devoid of other filling nutrients, like protein and fiber.

With foods that are high in sugar or are highly processed, your body and brain have trouble telling you that you’ve had enough. Instead of getting cues that your stomach is full, these foods can send signals to tell the brain to continue eating, even when you’ve had too much.

Perhaps the popularity of the “low-fat trend” really is waning… Read the full article here:

Business Insider: Why you should never eat light ice cream

Want to learn more about the problems with low-fat products, sugar and their effects on insulin? See the links below.

Videos on sugar


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    Are All Carbohydrates Equally Bad?23:08Are all carbs equal – or are some forms worse than others? Is it safe to eat fruit?

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    How do you become sugar free?29:24What is it like being a sugar addict? And what’s it like to struggle to break free from it?

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    Is Sugar Toxic?31:44Could sugar really be toxic? Isn’t it natural and part of the human diet since like forever?

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    The problem with sugar50:01Is it fat or sugar that has triggered the unprecedented epidemics of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic disease? Taubes at Low Carb USA 2017.

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    Q&A About Low Carb and Sugar59:31Dr. Michael Eades, Karen Thomson, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt and Emily Maguire answer questions related to low carb and sugar.

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    Action on Sugar37:12Why is sugar today just like tobacco a few decades ago? And what should we do about it? Dr. Malhotra answers these questions.

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    Breaking Up With Sugar Addiction21:28What is it like being a sugar addict? And what is it like to struggle to break free from it?

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    Sugar: Friend or Foe?24:11Is sugar really the enemy? Doesn’t it have a place in our diets? Emily Maguire at the Low Carb USA 2016.

Insulin


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    Weight Control – Calories or Insulin36:26Is weight loss controlled by calories in and calories out? Or is our body weight carefully regulated by hormones?

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    Is obesity caused by too much insulin?25:27Is obesity mainly caused by the fat storing hormone insulin? Dr. Ted Naiman answers this question.

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    What causes insulin resistance?29:01No less than 70% of people die from chronic disease, connected to insulin resistance. Dr. Naiman explains what causes it.

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    The Pathways of Insulin Resistance30:41Are we chasing the wrong guy when it comes to heart disease? And if so, what is the real culprit in the disease?

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    Hyperinsulinemia - What Insulin Does in Your Body45:29Controlling the insulin in your body can help you control both your weight and important aspects of your health. Dr. Naiman explains how.

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    Why We Get Fat47:30Why do we get fat – and what can we do about it? Gary Taubes at Low Carb USA 2016.

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    The Key to Obesity44:22How insulin toxicity causes obesity and type 2 diabetes – and how to reverse it. Dr Jason Fung at the LCHF Convention 2015.

More


Low carb for beginners

The problem with low-fat products

New study: salads are healthier with full-fat dressing

The post “Why you should never eat light ice cream” appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Sugar/fructose  Insulin  Failed low-fat diets
Can children eat strict low-carb meals?

Diet Doctor
 
Can children eat strict low-carb meals?

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Is it dangerous to let children eat strict low carb? Should you eat all your daily calories in one meal if you practice intermittent fasting? And how much fat is too much?

Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt:

Can my children eat low carb?


Hello,

I am hoping to have my children ages 13 and 11 eat the meals I prepare BUT I also do want to be to strict. I also want to allow them to have treats.

Can mixing high fat and carbs be harmful to them?

Thank you very much,
Criss

Hi Criss!

It should be fine. Eating a low-carb meal once in a while should be more than safe for children, it should likely be beneficial for them. Most kids eat more refined carbs than they need, so it should be a good thing to avoid once in a while.

Best,
Andreas Eenfeldt

If I eat 1 meal a day, should I eat the “daily dose” of calories all at once?


Hello doctor Eenfeldt,

When I eat only one meal a day, must I then eat the same amount of calories that I would do in two or three meals a day?

If I eat only one meal a day (eat until satisfied) and this would only count for example 1,400 calories, would this have the same effect as a caloric-restricted diet. Because not eating enough calories can slow down the metabolism. Or should my one meal contain at least the “daily dose” of calories (for example by adding enough fat to the meal).

Thanks in advance,
Eddy

Only eat until you feel satisfied. No need to eat more than that.

Best,
Andreas Eenfeldt

How much fat is too much?


I am eating about 75% or 161+ grams of fat per day. 20 grams of carbs, ie 5% and 85 grams (20%) protein. Most of the fat is made up of butter or cream or coconut oil. I am scared I’m overdoing the fat. Please advise. Thank you.

Irma

Hi Irma!

Impossible to say as it’s very individual, people need different amounts depending on body size, activity, age etc.

If you need that fat to stay satisfied and not hungry after meals it may be the perfect right level for you. If not, reducing the amount may help you lose weight (if that’s a goal of yours).

Best,
Andreas Eenfeldt

More


Keto for beginners

How to lose weight

More questions and answers


Many more questions and answers:

Low-carb Q&A

Read all earlier questions and answers – and ask your own! – here:

Ask Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt about LCHF, diabetes and weight loss – for members (free trial available).

Q&A


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    Is saturated fat bad?07:29Low carb is great. But could the saturated fat clog your arteries and kill you? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

  • Image/photo

    Everything in moderation?05:44What’s the point of low carb, shouldn’t we all just try to eat everything in moderation? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Can you get depressed on low carb?02:42Can you get depressed on a low-carb diet? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Is low carb bad for exercise?02:45Can you exercise on a low-carb diet? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Isn't weight loss all about counting calories?03:14To lose weight, you just eat fewer calories than you burn. Is it really that simple? Top low-carb doctors answer.

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    Are there potential dangers with a low-carb diet?09:30Can a low-carb diet potentially be dangerous? And if so – how? Top low-carb doctors answer these questions.

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    Is Low Carb Bad for the Kidneys?04:25Can a low-carb diet potentially be bad for the kidneys? Or is it just a myth, like most other low-carb fears?

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    What is the Main Benefit of Low Carb?02:52What exactly is the greatest benefit of low carb? Doctors give their top answer.

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    Is Low Carb Bad for the Thyroid?06:28Does a low-carb diet impact thyroid function? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Why is Low Carb Important to You?04:16Why is low carb important to Dr. Rangan Chatterjee and Dr. Sarah Hallberg?

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    Is Low Carb an Extreme Diet?06:20Is low carb really an extreme diet? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Is low carb bad for the environment?07:09Won’t low carb contribute to global warming and pollution? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Is Low Carb Bad for Gut Bacteria?02:14Can a low-carb diet be potentially harmful to your gut microbiome?

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    Does the Brain Need Carbohydrates?05:56Doesn’t the brain need carbohydrates? Doctors answer common questions.

Videos with Dr. Eenfeldt


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    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

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    How to eat LCHF11:18Dr. Eenfeldt on what you need to know to start eating a low-carb, high-fat diet.

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    The 5 common mistakes on LCHF09:25Is it hard to reach your goal weight, are you hungry or do you feel bad? Make sure you're avoiding these mistakes.

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    Keto for beginners: How it works08:37How does a keto diet work? Learn all you need to know, in part 2 of the keto course.

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    Keto for beginners: What to eat?11:22What do you eat on a keto diet? Get the answer in part 3 of the keto course.

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    The top 5 tips for weight loss15:58Dr. Eenfeldt's get-started course part 4: Struggling on low carb? Then this is for you: Dr. Eenfeldt's top weight loss tips.

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

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    Diet & diabetes – how to normalize your blood sugar16:26Dr. Eenfeldt's get-started course part 3: How to improve type 2 diabetes dramatically using a simple lifestyle change.

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    Weight Control – Calories or Insulin36:26Is weight loss controlled by calories in and calories out? Or is our body weight carefully regulated by hormones?

  • Image/photo

    A Global Food Revolution39:01There’s a global food revolution going on. A paradigm shift in how we look at fat and sugar. Dr. Eenfeldt at Low Carb Vail 2016.

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    Update from Sweden44:39People are revolutionizing their health with low-carb diets in Sweden.

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    The Food Revolution51:51There’s a global food revolution going on. A paradigm shift in how we look at fat and sugar. Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt at the Low Carb Convention 2015.

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    A global food revolution48:15There’s a global food revolution going on. A paradigm shift in how we look at fat and sugar. Dr. Eenfeldt at the Low Carb USA 2016.

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    Q&A About Low Carb and Sugar59:31Dr. Michael Eades, Karen Thomson, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt and Emily Maguire answer questions related to low carb and sugar.

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 Weight loss  Q&A  Keto  Intermittent fasting  Food for kids  Low Carb High Fat
A “warning signal” about ultra-processed foods

Diet Doctor
 
A “warning signal” about ultra-processed foods

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A recent large-scale study published in the BMJ followed 105,000 people, mostly middle-aged women, for 5 years. It found that the more ultra-processed foods people ate, the higher their risk of cancer.

What are ultra-processed foods?

The study classified ultra-processed foods as:
  • Mass-produced packaged breads and buns
  • Sweet or savory packaged snacks including chips
  • Chocolate bars and sweets
  • Sodas and sweetened drinks
  • Meatballs, poultry and fish nuggets
  • Instant noodles and soups
  • Frozen or shelf-life ready meals
  • Foods made mostly or entirely from sugar, oils and fats
What were the results of the study?
  • On average, 18% of people’s diet was ultra-processed
  • On average, there were 79 cancers per 10,000 people each year
  • People eating 10% more processed food had nine extra cases of cancer per 10,000 people per year
What was the conclusion?

The researchers concluded that:
These results suggest that the rapidly increasing consumption of ultra-processed foods may drive an increasing burden of cancer in the next decades.

This study is only observational and can’t prove causation. But the evidence keeps mounting up in favor of eating real, unprocessed foods for good health and reduced risk of developing a chronic disease. Don’t forget to be equally wary of ultra-processed low carb products. They are still fake food, and they’re not necessarily better for you than the items listed in this study.

Read the full article here:

BBC: Ultra-processed foods ‘linked to cancer’

Low-carb basics


  • Image/photo

    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

  • Image/photo

    How to eat LCHF11:18Dr. Eenfeldt on what you need to know to start eating a low-carb, high-fat diet.

  • Image/photo

    The 5 common mistakes on LCHF09:25Is it hard to reach your goal weight, are you hungry or do you feel bad? Make sure you're avoiding these mistakes.

  • Image/photo

    Is saturated fat bad?07:29Low carb is great. But could the saturated fat clog your arteries and kill you? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

  • Image/photo

    Cereal Killers1:00:07What if you could – in fact – break records without eating massive amounts of carbs?

  • Image/photo

    Everything in moderation?05:44What’s the point of low carb, shouldn’t we all just try to eat everything in moderation? Top low-carb doctors answer this question.

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    Living low carb with Caroline Smale07:30Caroline Smale shares her low-carb story and how she lives low carb on a daily basis.

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    How to achieve a healthy low-carb lifestyle46:42How should you formulate a low-carb or keto diet exactly in order to maximize success? How much fat, protein and carbs should you eat?

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    Fat Head Director's Cut1:46:20This movie follows stand-up comedian Tom Naughton as he tries to lose weight on a fast-food diet, to prove Morgan “Super Size Me” Spurlock wrong.

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet48:32Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others.

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    "A more pleasurable way to live"10:51Franziska Spritzler talks about what turned her into a low-carb dietitian.

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    The Cause of Obesity38:45What is the real cause of obesity? What causes weight gain? Dr. Jason Fung at Low Carb Vail 2016.

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    7 Tips to Make Low Carb Simple09:41The star of the BBC series Doctor in the House, Dr. Rangan Chatterjee, gives you seven tips that will make low carb easy.

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    Are there potential dangers with a low-carb diet?09:30Can a low-carb diet potentially be dangerous? And if so – how? Top low-carb doctors answer these questions.

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    What is the Main Benefit of Low Carb?02:52What exactly is the greatest benefit of low carb? Doctors give their top answer.

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    Why is Low Carb Important to You?04:16Why is low carb important to Dr. Rangan Chatterjee and Dr. Sarah Hallberg?

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    Q&A with Franziska Spritzler09:52Questions about how to formulate an optimal low-carb or keto diet.

Real food


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    Coming soon: Cooking keto with Kristie02:57Do you like food? Do you eat a low-carb or keto diet? Then we have something very special coming up for you.

  • Image/photo

    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

  • Image/photo

    Keto and fast food10:28Can you get low-carb food at fast-food restaurants? Ivor Cummins and Bjarte Bakke went to a number of fast-food restaurants to find out.

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    Making Low Carb Really Fun and Good13:24Learn how to make great keto foods with Maria Emmerich!

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    Food as Medicine14:00How do you treat patients using low-carb dietary interventions? Dr. Jeffry Gerber knows and we had the honor of following him one day in his clinic to see how he works.

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    Are all calories the same?20:04Are all calories created equally – regardless of whether they come from a low-carb, low-fat or a vegan diet?

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    "Just Stop Demonizing Real Food"21:24Is saturated fat bad? What does science say? And if saturated fat is not dangerous, how long will it take for our guidelines to change?

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    Physicians for Ancestral Health02:59Physicians for Ancestral Health is a network of doctors using real-food principles to treat patients.

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    Should Dietary Fat Guidelines Have Been Introduced?33:54Should you fear butter? Or has the fear of fat been a mistake from the start? Dr. Harcombe explains.

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    Run – and Eat – for Your Life27:33Dr. Mark Cucuzzella on low-carb adaptation for performance.

 Junk food  Industrial food-like products  Food industry
Meal prep: low-carb breakfasts

Diet Doctor
 
Meal prep: low-carb breakfasts

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Looking for something quick to grab for breakfast during busy weeks? Here are our top low-carb recipes for delicious breakfasts that you can prepare ahead and enjoy in no time throughout the week.
Meal prep: low-carb breakfasts

Popular low-carb breakfasts

The post Meal prep: low-carb breakfasts appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Featured recipes  Low Carb High Fat
The keto diet: “Your eating plans, shopping lists and recipes are AMAZING”

Diet Doctor
 
The keto diet: “Your eating plans, shopping lists and recipes are AMAZING”

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Over 340,000 people have signed up for our free two-week keto low-carb challenge. You’ll get free guidance, meal plans, recipes, shopping lists and troubleshooting tips – everything you need to succeed on a keto diet.
Here are new fantastic stories from the people who’ve taken the challenge:

Feedback

9 lbs in two weeks – amazing! Great program – highly recommended! Thank you!

John
Have been struggling with weight loss for years, and just did the 2 week challenge and lost over 5 lbs!! Most of the recipes are very good, however, the kids don’t enjoy all of them so have to cook something different for them sometimes.

I’m actually thinking of doing it again for another two weeks and see how it goes from there. Thanks very much for offering this online and with the information. Previously, I was always reducing carb intake and eating low fat foods, and exercising… without seeing any results.

Who would have thought I wasn’t eating enough fat!! I was amazed by the information you shared and have totally changed the way I look at food now. The only thing I really missed from the 2-week challenge was fruit, as I love fruit. With gratitude for the information, education, and the eye-openers!

Frances
Excellent, my weight did not change, but I feel fantastic

Alma
I think it’s one of the best eating plans I have undertaken. I lost 5.3 kg in two weeks. Very happy with the result.

Thanks, Deb
Thank you so much for your amazing work and brilliant program/website. I am a 57-year old female from Victoria, Australia. I’ve been suffering from polymyalgia for a couple of years and gained weight due to the medication (corticosteroids). Your ketogenic diet has proved to be the missing link in my recovery plan and I just can’t thank you and your team enough for all your hard work.

It’s only been three weeks but already I’ve noticed that the pain and inflammation is settling, I’m losing 2 lbs. (1 kg) a week and for the first time in a long time, I actually have hope that there is light at the end of tunnel.

Your eating plans, shopping lists and recipes are AMAZING, and it all makes it just so easy to follow and stick to the diet – well done! I’ve now signed up and look forward to continuing with keto and I hope others can be inspired by testimonials from all of us that have ‘flicked the switch in our brains’ and made the choice to go Keto.

Warmest wishes, Kerrie-Ann


Try it yourself


Sign up for the free 2-week keto low-carb challenge!

Alternatively, use our free keto low-carb guide, or for maximum simplicity try out our awesome keto meal planner service – it’s free to use for a month.


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Success stories


  • Image/photo

    Living low carb with Caroline Smale07:30Caroline Smale shares her low-carb story and how she lives low carb on a daily basis.

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    How to make keto sustainable15:00How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible?

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    Living low carb with Chris Hannaway08:19What does living low carb look like? Chris Hannaway shares his success story, takes us for a spin in the gym and orders food at the local pub.

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    "My Doctor Urged Me to Take Statins"20:17Diamond became highly interested in cholesterol and heart disease, and was able to make vast improvements – without ever taking medications.

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    Challenging The Dogma16:47Dr. Priyanka Wali tried a ketogenic diet and felt great. After reviewing the science she started recommending it to patients.

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    Treating cancer with a keto diet17:07Can a strict keto diet help prevent or even treat some cancers, like brain cancer?

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    Making Low Carb Really Fun and Good13:24Learn how to make great keto foods with Maria Emmerich!

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    A Life Without Migraines15:44Elena Gross' life was completely transformed with the ketogenic diet.

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    How to Lose 150 Pounds on LCHF15:27Desi Miller lost 150 pounds on an LCHF diet five years ago, and she’s managed to keep it off. Here she tells her story.

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    The 10-Week Low-Carb Journey09:01Charlotte Summers about the low-carb program at diabetes.co.uk, people's results and going against conventional advice.

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    "It Was So Incredibly Easy!"16:53In this interview Stephen Bennett shares what he has learned from his low-carb journey.

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    "I Have Been Following the Wrong Advice!"16:39How Antonio Martinez finally managed to reverse his type 2 diabetes.

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    How do you become sugar free?29:24What is it like being a sugar addict? And what’s it like to struggle to break free from it?

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    Losing Weight and Reversing Diabetes11:36Is it possible to lose weight and reverse diabetes with a simple dietary change, even without adding any extra exercise? That’s exactly what Maureen Brenner did.

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    100 Pounds Gone Without Calorie Counting24:12Can eating an LCHF diet effortlessly make you lose 100 pounds and change your life?

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    Losing Weight with Less Protein09:24Jimmy Moore talks about the greatest insight that made it possible for him to get rid of 80 stubborn pounds (36 kg) without hunger.

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    Carbs or not for type 1 diabetics?14:46How much simpler is it to control type 1 diabetes on low carb compared to on a high-carb diet? Andrew Koutnik has had great success managing his condition with a low-carb, high-fat diet.

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    Low carb was the only thing that helped11:17Benjamin Kuo had tried everything to lose weight. But nothing worked until he found low carb.

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    "Dietary Guidelines for Whom?"09:45It's time for a major change when it comes to dietary guidelines.

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    Improve Type 1 Diabetes with Low Carb38:39Dr. Keith Runyan has type 1 diabetes and eats low carb. Here's his experience, the good news and his concerns.

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    He Questioned His Own Beliefs15:02Dr. Peter Brukner explains why he went from being a high-carb to a low-carb advocate.

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    Practicing and Promoting Low Carb18:16Dr. Joanne McCormack realized that the dietary advice we're giving to diabetics just don't work.

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    Can You Reverse MS with a Diet Change?14:23Dr. Terry Wahls tells her remarkable story about MS, diet and recovery.

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    Very Low-Carb Performance22:45Interview with Dr. Attia about ketogenic diets for athletic performance and health.

Low-carb basics


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    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

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    How to eat LCHF11:18Dr. Eenfeldt on what you need to know to start eating a low-carb, high-fat diet.

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 Success stories
“Cigarette companies don’t sponsor the Olympics. Why does Coca-Cola?”

Diet Doctor
 
“Cigarette companies don’t sponsor the Olympics. Why does Coca-Cola?”

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As the level of sporting achievements increases worldwide, so does the global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes. A recent article in The Guardian points out that when children watch the Olympic Games on TV, their viewing is…
…interrupted every other minute by advertisements from official sponsors like Coca-Cola and partners like McDonalds, the very companies that provide the food products that could be the biggest obstacle not only to becoming an Olympic athlete, but also to living a healthy and happy life.

The article goes on to point out that while the advertising of tobacco products at the Olympics has been banned since 1988, the advertising of junk food is a different story. Children and adults alike continue to be barraged with clever marketing strategies that are specifically designed to drive them to consume products with undeniable negative health impacts.

The writers of the article are the president of the World Obesity Federation and the chair of NCD Child. They reckon that:
The time has come when we should be able to enjoy elite athletics without having to endure the constant advertising for fast food.

And we agree. Read the full article here:

The Guardian: Cigarette companies don’t sponsor the Olympics. Why does Coca-Cola?

Want to learn more about sugar, diabetes and the obesity epidemic? See the links below.

Videos on sugar


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    Are All Carbohydrates Equally Bad?23:08Are all carbs equal – or are some forms worse than others? Is it safe to eat fruit?

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    How do you become sugar free?29:24What is it like being a sugar addict? And what’s it like to struggle to break free from it?

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    Is Sugar Toxic?31:44Could sugar really be toxic? Isn’t it natural and part of the human diet since like forever?

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    The problem with sugar50:01Is it fat or sugar that has triggered the unprecedented epidemics of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic disease? Taubes at Low Carb USA 2017.

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    Q&A About Low Carb and Sugar59:31Dr. Michael Eades, Karen Thomson, Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt and Emily Maguire answer questions related to low carb and sugar.

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    Action on Sugar37:12Why is sugar today just like tobacco a few decades ago? And what should we do about it? Dr. Malhotra answers these questions.

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    Breaking Up With Sugar Addiction21:28What is it like being a sugar addict? And what is it like to struggle to break free from it?

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    Sugar: Friend or Foe?24:11Is sugar really the enemy? Doesn’t it have a place in our diets? Emily Maguire at the Low Carb USA 2016.

Diabetes


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    How to Reverse Diabetes Type 210:23Dr. Fung's diabetes course part 1: How do you reverse your type 2 diabetes?

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    How to Avoid Complications of Type 1 Diabetes37:28Why are the recommendations to people with diabetes to eat a high-carb diet a bad idea? And what is the alternative?

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

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    The perfect treatment for diabetes and weight loss45:20Do doctors treat type 2 diabetes completely wrong today – in a way that actually makes the disease worse?

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet48:32Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others.

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    The Essential Problem with Type 2 Diabetes05:13Dr. Fung's diabetes course part 2: What exactly is the essential problem of type 2 diabetes?

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    Diet & diabetes – how to normalize your blood sugar16:26Dr. Eenfeldt's get-started course part 3: How to improve type 2 diabetes dramatically using a simple lifestyle change.

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    Motivating people to change their lives51:45How do you help and motivate people to start and stay on a low-carb diet?

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    Mission: Reverse Diabetes18:15Is it possible to reverse diabetes in 100 million people by the year 2025? Here’s our most ambitious film project yet.

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    Hyperinsulinemia - What Insulin Does in Your Body45:29Controlling the insulin in your body can help you control both your weight and important aspects of your health. Dr. Naiman explains how.

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    A Disease of Insulin Resistance09:32Part 3 of Dr. Fung's diabetes course: The core of the disease, insulin resistance, and the molecule that causes it.

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    Keto-Adaptation and Performance58:58Professor Jeff Volek gives a great overview of the benefits of making your body burn fat for fuel.

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    The 2 Big Lies of Type 2 Diabetes42:54Why is the conventional treatment of Type 2 Diabetes an utter failure? Dr. Jason Fung at the LCHF Convention 2015.

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    Treating the Symptoms or the Cause?04:15Dr. Fung's diabetes course part 4: Why most drugs uselessly move sugar around the body. It's better to get rid of it.

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    Therapeutic Fasting46:09What if there was a more effective treatment alternative for obesity and type 2 diabetes, that is both simple and free?

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    Clinical Experience Using LCHF26:08Can people eat low carb in the long run? What are the most common mistakes? Do calories matter?

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    "Type 2 Diabetes Management Can Be Pretty Simple"18:52Dr. Sadhra advises aspiring doctors that managing type 2 diabetes can be pretty simple as long as you eat low carb. Medications are not the first line of treatment.

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    "I Have Been Following the Wrong Advice!"16:39How Antonio Martinez finally managed to reverse his type 2 diabetes.

More


Low carb for beginners

Big Sugar tried to hide research linking sugar and cancer 50 years ago

Coke sued for deception – just like big tobacco

The post “Cigarette companies don’t sponsor the Olympics. Why does Coca-Cola?” appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 The obesity epidemic  Junk food  Food industry  Diabetes  Exercise
Q&A with Robb Wolf

Diet Doctor
 
Q&A with Robb Wolf


https://vimeo.com/video/236071646


666 views
Continuing from his talk about the ketogenic diet as a treatment for traumatic brain injury, Robb Wolf answers questions related to this.
Watch a part of the Q&A session above (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership:

Q&A with Robb Wolf

Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service.

Keto


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    Keto for beginners: Introduction08:02Learn how to do a keto diet right, in part 1 of our video course.

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    Keto for beginners: How it works08:37How does a keto diet work? Learn all you need to know, in part 2 of the keto course.

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    Keto for beginners: What to eat?11:22What do you eat on a keto diet? Get the answer in part 3 of the keto course.

  • Image/photo

    Fat Chance1:05:43Is it possible to ride a pushbike across the Australian continent (2,100 miles) without eating carbs?

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    How to make keto sustainable15:00How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible?

  • Image/photo

    How to achieve a healthy low-carb lifestyle46:42How should you formulate a low-carb or keto diet exactly in order to maximize success? How much fat, protein and carbs should you eat?

  • Image/photo

    Coming soon: Cooking keto with Kristie02:57Do you like food? Do you eat a low-carb or keto diet? Then we have something very special coming up for you.

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    10 years of ketogenic research22:05Dr. Dominic D’Agostino, top keto researcher, teaches you how to get into ketosis... and why you may want it.

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    How to formulate a low-carb keto diet48:32Low-carb pioneer Dr. Eric Westman talks about how to formulate an LCHF diet, low carb for different medical conditions and common pitfalls among others.

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    How to become a fat-burning machine11:30Dr. Eric Westman explains the concepts fat-burning mode and carb-burning mode. Dr. Westman's LCHF course part 2.

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    Keto and fast food10:28Can you get low-carb food at fast-food restaurants? Ivor Cummins and Bjarte Bakke went to a number of fast-food restaurants to find out.

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    Is lower insulin the key to better brain health?46:36What is the root cause of the Alzheimer's epidemic – and how should we intervene before the disease is fully developed?

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    Eating keto to survive cancer28:51Audra Wilford on the experience of using a ketogenic diet as part of treating her son Max’s brain tumor.

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    Do you need to check your ketones?22:19Should you measure ketones on a ? Dr. Westman guides you through all the situations when measuring is beneficial – and when it's not.

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    Challenging The Dogma16:47Dr. Priyanka Wali tried a ketogenic diet and felt great. After reviewing the science she started recommending it to patients.

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    Treating cancer with a keto diet17:07Can a strict keto diet help prevent or even treat some cancers, like brain cancer?

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    Nutritional ketosis and metabolic-based research1:05:18Dr. Dominic D'Agostino's presentation gives valuable insights into the keto research which is currently conducted across the world.

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    A New Life with a Keto Diet13:38If your muscles can't use stored glycogen, is it then a good idea to eat a high-carb diet to compensate for this? Or can a keto diet help treat these rare glycogen storage diseases?

More


Keto for beginners

The post Q&A with Robb Wolf appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Low Carb USA  Ketosis  About membership  Keto  Depression  Q&A
Attacking cancer’s weakness: not its strengths

Diet Doctor
 
Attacking cancer’s weakness: not its strengths

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In our last post, we detailed the 6 Hallmarks of Cancer originally described in 2001. In the 2011 update researchers added two ‘enabling characteristics’ and two ’emerging hallmarks’. The two enabling characteristics are not hallmarks, but enable the hallmarks to happen. The first one was ‘Genome instability and mutation’, which is kind of obvious. As cancers have hundreds of mutations, it is self-evident that the genome must be able to mutate, and thus the genome has some inherent instability. This adds very little to the understanding of cancer. The second is ‘Tumor Promoting Inflammation’. It has long been recognized that all cancers have inflammatory cells within them. Since inflammation is a response to injury, this is an expected result of the body trying to rid itself of the cancer. Natural killer cells had been long described, which are immune cells patrolling around the blood trying to kill off cancer cells. However, newer research pointed to the fact that this inflammation was in many cases paradoxically doing the opposite – helping the tumor. While interesting, these two enabling characteristics shed little light unto how cancer originates and spreads.

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Two new hallmarks of cancer


In addition to these two enabling characteristics, two emerging hallmarks were added. The first ‘Evading Immune Destruction’ reflects the immune surveillance theory. Our immune system is always patrolling the blood and killing off micro metastatic cancers before they get established. Patients with immune deficiency such as HIV, or others, such as transplant recipients, who are given immune suppressing drugs, are much more likely to develop cancer. Again, interesting, but the description of these hallmarks sheds little light upon cancer’s origins. Cancer cells all just show the three basic characteristics we talked about previously:
  • They grow (avoiding immune destruction falls here)
  • They are immortal
  • They move around (metastasize)
The other new hallmark is ‘Reprogramming Energy Metabolism’. This is fascinating. Under normal conditions, the cell generates energy through aerobic (meaning ‘with oxygen’) glycolysis. If oxygen is present, the mitochondrion of the cell generate energy in the form of ATP. Mitochondrion are organelles, which are like small organs of the cell that provide energy generation – the powerhouses of the cells. Using glucose, mitochondrion use oxygen to generate 36 ATP through a process called ‘oxidative phosphorylation’ or OxPhos. If there is no oxygen, this does not work. For example, if you are sprinting full out, you require a lot of energy in a short space of time. There is not enough oxygen to undergo the usual mitochondrial OxPhos. So instead, the cell uses anaerobic (without oxygen) glycolysis, which generates lactic acid, responsible for the familiar muscle burn upon heavy physical exertion. This creates energy in the absence of oxygen, but only generates 2 ATP per glucose molecule instead of 36. A reasonable tradeoff in the appropriate circumstance.

Cancer cells use the less efficient process to generate energy


For every glucose molecule, you can generate 18 times more energy by using oxygen and mitochondrion. Cancer cells, almost universally, use the less efficient anaerobic pathway. In order to compensate for the lower efficiency of energy generation, cancer cells have much higher requirements for glucose and increase GLUT1 glucose transporters. This is the basis for the positron emission tomography (PET) scan for cancer. In this test, labeled glucose is injected into the body. Since cancer takes up glucose far more rapidly than normal cells, you can track the activity and location of cancers. This switch happens in every cancer, and is known as the Warburg Effect. At first glance, this represents an interesting paradox. Cancer, which is growing rapidly, should require more energy, so why would cancer deliberately choose the LESS effective pathway of energy generation? Stranger and stranger. We will consider this in much more detail in the future, because this is anomaly that must be explained. Yet this is utterly fascinating, because it is trying to explain the paradoxes that move science forward.

Modern cancer research had dismissed this unusual paradox by pretending it is some minor observation of minor importance. Yet, it is so unimportant that virtually every single cancer cell of every type does this? Even though new cancers cells develop all the time, they all share this unusual characteristic. The 2011 update corrects this oversight by adding it to its rightful place as a Hallmark of Cancer.

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Considering these 8 hallmarks and enabling characteristics, it is possible to look at the drugs/ treatments now being developed to attack cancer on all these fronts. Sounds and looks pretty impressive, and I would expect no less from the many, many billions of dollars poured into cancer research over the past few decades. The least they could do is generate some pretty pictures if they’re not going to produce any real clinical breakthroughs. Like tomorrow, the next breakthrough is always just around the corner, but never comes. Why? The problem is obvious once pointed out. We are attacking cancer’s strengths, not its weaknesses.

Focusing on cancer’s weaknesses


Image/photoWe’ve catalogued a number of features shared by most cancers. This is what cancer does better than any normal cell. And that’s what we’re going to attack. But isn’t this a recipe for a disaster? Consider this. I can easily beat Michael Jordan at his prime. I can easily beat Tiger Woods in his prime. I can easily beat Wayne Gretzky in his prime. Wow, you might think, this Dr. Fung guy is pretty deluded. Not at all. How do I do this? I don’t challenge them to basketball, golf or hockey. Instead I challenge them to a contest on medical physiology and then proceed to beat the pants off all three. I’d be an idiot to challenge Michael Jordan at basketball.

So let’s think about cancer. It grows and grows. That’s what it does better than anything we’ve ever known. So, we try to come up with a way to kill it. We use surgery, radiation and chemotherapy drugs (poisons). But cancer’s a survivor. It’s Wolverine of the X-men. You might want to kill him, but he’s more likely to kill you. Even as we use chemotherapy, for example, it may kill 99% of the cancer. But the 1% survive and become resistant to that particular drug. In the end, it’s marginally effective. Why would we challenge cancer at its strength? That’s challenging Michael Jordan to basketball. You’re an idiot if you think you’ll win.

So, next thing we know is that cancer mutates a lot. So we try to devise ways of trying to stop the mutations. Huh? Isn’t that challenging cancer at what it does best? Absolutely It’s challenging Tiger Woods to a game of golf. We also know that cancer can make new blood vessels. So we try to block it at it’s own game. Really? That’s challenging Wayne Gretzky to a game of hockey. Not fun. Indeed all the treatment pictured above suffer this same fatal mistake.

Image/photoSo is there no hope? Hardly. We just need to be smarter and understand cancer at a deeper level. The entire reasoning of cancer treatment is not much more sophisticated than caveman thinking. Grok see cancer grow. Grok kill cancer.

Well, let’s look at the hallmarks again:
  • They grow.
  • They are immortal.
  • They move around.
  • They deliberately use a less efficient method of energy extraction.
Huh? One of these does not fit with everything else. Cancer is growing all the time. This will require a lot of energy and cancer would be expected to use its mitochondrion to generate lots of energy per glucose molecule. But it does not. Almost every cancer instead chooses to use the less effective energy pathway even though there is plenty of oxygen around. That’s bizarre. Instead of using oxygen efficiently, cancer cells chose to burn glucose using fermentation. Suppose you were building a fast car. You make it sleek, low to the ground and put a spoiler on the back. Then you take out the 600 horsepower motor and put in a 9 horsepower lawnmower engine. Huh? It’s bizarre. Why would cancer do the same? And it was no coincidence. Virtually every cancer does this. Whatever the reason, it is critical to cancer’s origin.

This is not a new discovery. Otto Warburg, the 1931 winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology, had studied the energy metabolism of normal cells and cancer extensively. He wrote “Cancer, above all other diseases, has countless secondary causes. But, even for cancer, there is only one prime cause. Summarized in a few words, the prime cause of cancer is the replacement of the respiration of oxygen in normal body cells by a fermentation of sugar”.

The Warburg Effect. Now we’re starting to get somewhere. To truly defeat your enemy, you must know them.


Dr. Jason Fung

Dr. Fung’s top posts about cancer


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    1Fasting, cellular cleansing and cancer – is there a connection?

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    2Autophagy – a cure for many present-day diseases?

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    3What diet causes cancer?

Dr. Fung


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    What is fasting?05:21Dr. Fung's fasting course part 1: A brief introduction to intermittent fasting.

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    How to Maximize Fat Burning03:52Dr. Fung's fasting course part 2: How do you maximize fat burning? What should you eat – or not eat?

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    The Top 5 Tips to Make Fasting Easier05:19Dr. Fung's fasting course part 8: Dr. Fung's top tips for fasting

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    Breakfast! Is it really that important?07:08Dr. Fung's fasting course part 6: Is it really that important to eat breakfast?

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    The Most Common Questions05:38Dr. Fung's fasting course part 7: Answers to the most common questions about fasting.

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Dr. Fung has his own blog at idmprogram.com. He is also active on Twitter.

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Dr. Fung’s books The Obesity Code and The Complete Guide to Fasting are available on Amazon.

The post Attacking cancer’s weakness: not its strengths appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Cancer
“The rise of ultra-processed fake meat”

Diet Doctor
 
“The rise of ultra-processed fake meat”

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We see a lot in the media about the potentially harmful effects that industrially produced meat, dairy and eggs can have on the environment. Perhaps that’s why Quorn, a manufacturer of meat-imitation products, is on track to become a billion-dollar business. But a recent article in The Guardian posed an important question: What actually is Quorn?

The brand markets a number of different products with an “[a]rtful use of additives and hi-tech ingredients in the food manufacturer’s cabinet – factory flavourings and colourings, milk proteins, tapioca starch, palm oil, pea fibre, firming and gelling agents and so on.”

We’ve posted a number of times about the supposed dangers of meat consumption. A growing industry of an ultra-processed meat substitute that’s a far cry from being real food shows a worrying trend. We should be aware that ultra-processed fake meats full of additives is an experiment, and we don’t yet know what the long-term effects of eating it are, whether good or bad.

Conscious consumers who want to take care of their health and the environment can choose good-quality meat sources from humanely-raised livestock and focus on eating real foods that truly nourish their body. As always, read the label, and if you buy packaged foods, aim for products with as few ingredients as possible.

Read the full article here:
The Guardian: The Quorn Revolution: The rise of ultra-processed fake meat

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The post “The rise of ultra-processed fake meat” appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Real food  Meat  Industrial food-like products  Food industry
How to order low-carb meals in the hospital – 10 essential tips to get higher-quality food

Diet Doctor
 
How to order low-carb meals in the hospital – 10 essential tips to get higher-quality food

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“Everything on this menu is full of carbs!”

“There’s nothing here I can eat with my diabetes!”

“I’m for sure going to put on weight with this menu.”

“This menu is horrible for diabetics!”

Ahhh, music to my ears… not because I enjoy seeing my patients frustrated, but rather because comments like these mean that they recognize the problem with typical hospital menus. The SAD state of hospital menus with their focus on low-fat options is a universal problem and has been ignored for too long.

Hospitals meet the challenge when catering to special diets such as low-salt, lactose-free, gluten-free, and any food allergies, but fall short when it comes to providing low-carb options. For individuals with medical problems that are sensitive to carbohydrate intake (e.g. obesity, diabetes), ordering food in a hospital will inevitably be a frustrating experience.

However, in the event that someone who wishes to eat low carb is hospitalized and subjected to archaic dietary orders and a poorly-crafted menu, there are strategies to make the best of the situation and to improve the quality of one’s meals. Though primarily directed at individuals with diabetes in the hospital setting, the principles behind these strategies are applicable to anyone who desires to eat low carb in the hospital when faced with limited food options.

Hospital food


As unappetizing as hospital food may be, it doesn’t need to be dangerous. Why, then, do hospitals give high-carb meals to patients who physiologically cannot tolerate carbohydrates (those with diabetes)?

I understand that there are numerous forces at play – dietary guidelines, patient satisfaction, ease of food preparation, cost of food, etc. – but that doesn’t excuse the deplorable food options available to those in most need of quality nutrition.

In our Band-Aid culture of healthcare (treating the symptoms, not the cause), healthcare organizations continue to underperform with their short-sighted approaches to patient care, concerned more about short-term cost-saving strategies than the more substantial, long-term benefits of real, unprocessed food. This short-sighted approach in healthcare is unacceptable, especially as I and other like-minded physicians struggle on the front line to provide the best care possible to patients who are already victims of decades of politics, marketing, and bad science.

“Diabetic diet”


Perhaps the most common diet ordered for diabetic patients in the hospital is the “Consistent Carbohydrate” diet that allows 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, encouraging patients to consume relatively the same amount of carbohydrates during each of their three meals per day. The diet order usually also allows for 1-2 snacks per day containing up to 15 grams of carbohydrates. Sadly, that means that a diabetic patient in the hospital could consume 210 grams of carbohydrates (comprised of sugar) daily.

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Link: Volume of 210 grams of sugar

The rationale for this “Consistent Carbohydrate” diet is that it is easier (and safer) to dose insulin to match the amount of carbohydrates ingested when the amount of carbs is relatively constant throughout the day. In contrast, a variable amount of carbohydrates consumed throughout the day requires a varying dose of insulin, which makes it more difficult to achieve good glycemic control and also increases the risk of hypoglycemia (low glucose), a risk of receiving too much insulin.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) no longer explicitly endorses a specific carbohydrate limit, acknowledging that there are multiple dietary approaches that may be beneficial and that a diet should be customized to an individual. In 2002, the ADA published a statement denouncing the terminology of “ADA diet”:
Although the term “ADA diet” has never been clearly defined, in the past it has usually meant a physician-determined calorie level with a specified percentage of carbohydrate, protein, and fat based on the exchange lists. It is recommended that the term “ADA diet” no longer be used, since the ADA no longer endorses any single meal plan or specified percentages of macronutrients as it has done in the past.

The damage is done, however, as their influence lives on in hospitals everywhere that continue to subscribe to this outdated, high-carbohydrate dietary approach to managing diabetes, such that any reference to a “Diabetic Diet” or “ADA Diet” typically defaults to the “Consistent Carbohydrate” Diet allowing (and even encouraging) 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal.

Strategies to improve hospital meals


What can you do then if you want to eat low carb in the hospital? If there is not a well-designed low-carb menu available, you may employ the following strategies to improve your dietary intake when your health is on the line.

1. Ask your doctor what diet he/she will be ordering for you. This inquiry is a great way to get the discussion started. If your doctor says, “an 1800-calorie ADA diet”, here are your two best options: 1) run, don’t walk, to another hospital; 2) ask for someone who has picked up a medical journal more recently than the dinosaur that you just encountered. More realistically, however, this is your chance to advocate for your own health by requesting access to low-carb food options. For diabetics, the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes – 2017 states:
Current nutrition recommendations advise individualization based on treatment goals, physiological parameters, and medication use.

Furthermore,
Diabetes self-management in the hospital may be appropriate for select youth and adult patients. Candidates include patients who successfully conduct self-management of diabetes at home, have the cognitive and physical skills needed to successfully self-administer insulin, and perform self-monitoring of blood glucose . . . have adequate oral intake, be proficient in carbohydrate estimation . . .

The ADA has paved the way for you to manage your own diabetes. Ask your doctor for permission to do so.

Also beware the “Cardiac Diet” – the lazy physicians’ default diet order for anyone they perceive to be at risk for cardiovascular disease. It is low fat, low saturated fat, low sodium, and painfully unappetizing. The so-called “evidence” for this dietary approach has been refuted many times over, but this low-fat dogma remains ingrained in health care.

2. Mix and match. Select the best low-carb meal available to you with quality sources of protein and fat – meat, fish, vegetables, and full-fat dairy.  Then, if needed, scan the menu and select any low-carb elements of other menu items to create your own low-carb meal.  Do not feel trapped by the pre-determined meals on the menu.  If you see an ingredient that you would like that comes with a different meal, ask to swap, add, hold, or whatever is necessary to create a better low-carb meal.  For example, you may need to ask the kitchen to hold high-carb portions of the meal (“May I have a hamburger without the bun?”) or request specific ingredients that may be part of other dishes (“May I have the scrambled eggs and onions that are part of the breakfast burrito along with the ham from the Eggs Benedict?”) Get creative.

3. Pick Sides. There are often several a la carte items available on the menu that may complement other menu items, or perhaps a few a la carte items together will make a reasonable meal. For example: hard-boiled eggs and a side of bacon/sausage; chicken breast and a side of non-starchy vegetables.

4. Request a general diet. Especially if there are limitations on your diet order, ask for an unrestricted (e.g. general) diet. A “general” diet may allow you the flexibility to order multiple menu items and then eat only the low-carb ingredients. If the cafeteria won’t hold the high-carb items, simply set them aside. It’s not “wasting food” if it wasn’t real food to begin with.

5. Beware of fillers/binders. A dirty secret among some restaurants is to mix cheap ingredients in with higher quality ingredients. For example, some restaurants/kitchens add pancake batter to their scrambled eggs – the eggs go further and will have a fluffier texture. Not only is this a cost-saving measure, but also the eggs are more appealing to the customers. To avoid this hazard, request that your egg[s] be boiled, fried, or poached. Meatloaf and meatballs are frequently prepared with bread crumbs as a binding agent to keep them from falling apart, and many sauces contain thickeners such as flour or corn starch. Ask about ingredients when you are ordering.

6. Negotiate for a trial period. Ask for the chance to prove to your treatment team that you can control your glucose with your food choices. Set parameters and a timeline to persuade them to give it a try. Example: “Will you please give me the chance to demonstrate that I can control my glucoses with my food choices when given the freedom to choose from a general diet? If my glucoses are not all below 150 for the next 24-hour period, you may resume your preferred diet order.”

7. Bring in food from outside the hospital. You may need to request permission from your treatment team to allow outside food brought in to you if you are on a restricted diet, whether by friends/family or by delivery. If you know that you will be hospitalized (e.g. an elective surgery), bring your own supply of food that is easy to transport and will not spoil. Note that the limitations of a restricted diet still apply to food brought into the hospital, and thus the content of the food needs to be compatible with the ordered diet. A good selling point for this approach is that this option actually benefits the hospital, in terms of reduced costs of food and labor.

8. Keep your own record of meals/glucoses. Perhaps the greatest (yet most under-utilized) tool at your disposal is the glucose meter or, better yet, a continuous glucose meter. Check and record your glucose immediately before your meal, and then repeat a glucose measurement 60-90 minutes after your meal (You’ll have to either request this post-meal glucose or do it yourself – it is not routinely performed). Monitoring how your glucose is affected by the food you eat is a powerful tool in managing diabetes. Use this knowledge to select food that causes little to no increase in your glucose, and avoid the foods that increase your glucose. This method of monitoring may also be the only way you will know if there were any “secret” ingredients mixed in your food (see #5).

9. Skipping meals/fasting. There are many situations in the hospital that require NPO (“nothing by mouth”) status, most commonly surgical procedures, some radiologic studies, and as part of the treatment plan for certain medical conditions (e.g. acute pancreatitis). Though many people act as if they’ll die from missing just one meal (I am constantly on the receiving end of “Hangry” patients), fasting (specifically intermittent fasting, not extended fasting) can be a very useful (and appropriate) metabolic tool, even for those who are sick enough to land in a hospital.  Hospitals certainly subscribe to the arbitrary convention of 3 meals per day, but that doesn’t mean that you need to.  That said, if you are hospitalized for an acute illness, ensure that you are getting adequate nutritional intake; you can address your long-term metabolic derangements later.  Obviously, fasting is not recommended if one is diagnosed with underweight or malnutrition.

10. Voice your opinions to administration. If your care team simply does not make an effort to accommodate your nutritional needs, it may be necessary to get administration involved, whether that’s a nursing supervisor or other position of authority available in-hospital. There may also be a patient advocate available to assist you through a conflict. Though these measures should be required only in rare situations, I encourage widespread use of non-urgent feedback to hospital administrators about the quality and availability of low carb food options. This feedback may take the form of a survey or, better yet, a well-written letter. If the problem is not called to their attention, there is no chance of convincing administration to improve the food options. Don’t forget to point out the positives as well as the negatives. It means a lot when you offer praise for hospital employees who provide exceptional care.

Caution: Do not threaten anyone with legal action. You may encounter advice recommending this course of action when one doesn’t get his/her way with food in the hospital. This approach is flawed due to the following: 1) You have no case. Hospitals have the dietary guidelines on their side, and their diabetic diets do not constitute a deviation from the standard of care. 2) It may negatively impact your care, even if only in subtle ways. Healthcare personnel are far too familiar with inflamed and entitled patients threatening legal action if they don’t get their way. Be civil and respectful – that will go a long way towards getting the type of care you want.

Be proactive


It’s bad enough that being hospitalized may be unexpected and unpleasant; you may also feel that you have lost your independence with basic activities, including eating. Hospitals (and healthcare, in general) may be lagging far behind the science when it comes to nutrition, but you may employ the abovementioned strategies to regain a sense of control and secure better food offerings for yourself when proper nutrition should be a priority.


Dr. Christopher Stadtherr

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Living low carb with Chris Hannaway

Diet Doctor
 
Living low carb with Chris Hannaway


https://vimeo.com/video/254508977


What does living low carb look like? Chris Hannaway shares his amazing success story, takes us for a spin in the gym and orders low-carb food at the local pub.
Watch a preview above. The full mini-documentary is available with a free trial or membership:

Living low carb – Chris Hannaway

Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service.

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 About membership  Success stories  Exercise  Diabetes stories  Weight loss
New study: Does an LCHF diet provide adequate nutrition?

Diet Doctor
 
New study: Does an LCHF diet provide adequate nutrition?

Image/photo
A new study in the BMJ has found that a low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet can provide adequate nutrition. The researchers who ran the study did so because, although the diet is being used more and more by doctors and health practitioners as a tool to dramatically improve their patients’ health, there is still “a belief that the diet is devoid of nutrients and concern around its saturated fat content.”

Their conclusion?
A well-planned LCHF meal plan can be considered micronutrient replete.

Once again, a common low carb myth is dispelled by science. Read the full article here:

BMJ Open: Assessing the nutrient intake of a low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diet: a hypothetical case study design

Want to learn more about an LCHF diet? See the links below.

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    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

  • Image/photo

    A strategy to make low carb adoptable19:54How Drs. Rutherford and Bhardwaj work to make the health authorities adopt low-carb strategies.

  • Image/photo

    Nutrition Nuggets to Combat Conventional Dietary Advice45:06What are the seven common beliefs that are just myths, and that hold us back from understanding how to eat truly healthy foods?

  • Image/photo

    Why Our Dietary Guidelines Are Wrong16:01How can experts keep saying that butter is dangerous, when there's no scientific support left?

  • Image/photo

    Creating Change in Public Health17:20How is the organization Public Health Collaboration UK contributing to changing the dietary guidelines?

  • Image/photo

    "I Have Been Following the Wrong Advice!"16:39How Antonio Martinez finally managed to reverse his type 2 diabetes.

  • Image/photo

    Professor Noakes on Trial28:47Dr. Zoe Harcombe and Nina Teicholz were expert witnesses at the Tim Noakes trial back in October and this is a bird's-eye view of what went on at the trial.

  • Image/photo

    LCHF – Who Benefits Financially?37:12Who benefits financially from low carb?

  • Image/photo

    "Just Stop Demonizing Real Food"21:24Is saturated fat bad? What does science say? And if saturated fat is not dangerous, how long will it take for our guidelines to change?

  • Image/photo

    Should Dietary Fat Guidelines Have Been Introduced?33:54Should you fear butter? Or has the fear of fat been a mistake from the start? Dr. Harcombe explains.

 New study  Myths about LCHF  Health
Is cholesterol the cause of heart disease?

Diet Doctor
 
Is cholesterol the cause of heart disease?


https://vimeo.com/video/238057850


1,398 views
Does cholesterol really cause heart disease? And if not – what does?
Dr. Malcolm Kendrick has studied and authored a book about cholesterol and heart disease. This is what he has to say on the topic.

Some of the points which are addressed in the interview are:
  • Why is the current theory about what causes heart disease wrong?
  • Is a high cholesterol dangerous?
  • Should anyone take statins?
  • What can people do to reduce their risk?
  • Why Dr. Kendrick got interested in cholesterol and heart disease.
Watch a part of our interview above, where he talks about whether he thinks people should take statins (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership:

Is cholesterol the cause of heart disease? – Dr. Malcolm Kendrick

Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service.

Cholesterol and heart disease


  • Image/photo

    Statin Nation1:02:45Statin Nation exposes the exaggerations and the misleading, almost criminal, marketing of daily drugs to people who don’t need them.

  • Image/photo

    Should You Worry About High Cholesterol?13:49Is high cholesterol inherently dangerous, who should (and shouldn't) take statins and what can you do instead of taking medications?

  • Image/photo

    "My Doctor Urged Me to Take Statins"20:17Diamond became highly interested in cholesterol and heart disease, and was able to make vast improvements – without ever taking medications.

  • Image/photo

    What really causes heart disease?49:51What is the root of the problem in heart disease? Is it cholesterol – which we've been told for decades – or is it something else?

  • Image/photo

    The Cholesterol Network System22:24Can you drastically lower your cholesterol, by eating MORE fat?

  • Image/photo

    Is cholesterol the cause of heart disease?23:54Does cholesterol really cause heart disease? And if not – what does?

  • Image/photo

    Nutrition Nuggets to Combat Conventional Dietary Advice45:06What are the seven common beliefs that are just myths, and that hold us back from understanding how to eat truly healthy foods?

  • Image/photo

    What about cholesterol?04:14Dr. Unwin discusses cholesterol on a low-carb diet. This includes common improvements and the rare case when patients' cholesterol increases significantly.

  • Image/photo

    Is High Cholesterol Dangerous on a Low-Carb Diet?11:22What does it mean if some parts of one's lipid profile improve, and some become worse on low carb? Dr. Sarah Hallberg answers this question.

  • Image/photo

    The Great Cholesterol Myth37:55“Eating all that fat and cholesterol will clog your arteries and give you heart disease!” Well, it’s not that simple.

  • Image/photo

    The Surprising Cause of Heart Disease38:18Do you want to know what really causes heart disease? It’s not cholesterol. Dwight Lundell gives you the answer.

  • Image/photo

    Statin Nation II1:15:35Is high cholesterol the main cause of heart disease? The follow up to the success Statin Nation.

  • Image/photo

    Practical Lipid Management34:55How should you think about cholesterol and heart disease? Dr. Cate Shanahan at Low Carb Vail 2016.

  • Image/photo

    Framingham and the Muddy Waters33:15Is there a better way to know if you're at risk for heart disease? Dr. Jeffry Gerber at Low Carb Vail 2016.

  • Image/photo

    LCHF and LDL28:56Can a low-carb diet be bad for your cholesterol? Dr. Sarah Hallberg at Low Carb Vail 2016

More


The Great Cholesterol Con by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick

Low carb for beginners

The post Is cholesterol the cause of heart disease? appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Science & health  Heart disease  Cholesterol  About membership
Ignoring the mainstream myths about low-carb ketogenic eating

Diet Doctor
 
Ignoring the mainstream myths about low-carb ketogenic eating

Image/photo
I have always thought of myself as a congenial person who doesn’t pick fights. I have learned through many years of public interactions that, usually, the most effective way to handle most issues in life is with rational, unemotional calmness — and kindness — if at all possible.

But, sigh, sometimes it’s not easy.

Recently, I have been feeling irritated, even angry and incensed about the lies, half-truths, deception or just plain ignorant statements that are proliferating these days about the low-carb ketogenic diet.

I’ve had to restrain myself this past month from firing off indignant, snarky, fact-filled emails to counter the latest poorly researched or downright biased articles in the mainstream media.

It’s not a fad; and we’re not idiots who don’t know what we’re doing


In the last few weeks, keto-bashing reports are everywhere, describing low carb ketogenic eating as the latest ridiculous diet fad that its followers like us are too dim-witted or gullible to recognize as 1) harming us; 2) ineffective or unrealistic; 3) setting us up (or our children) for future health problems; 4) unsustainable for regular folk; or 5) bad for the planet.

It makes me sad — especially when so many of us have had such dramatic health improvements by cutting carbs and upping fat. I fear for all the people who may not get the life-changing help they could benefit from, because their favourite newspaper or magazine, or an influential blogger, espoused inaccurate opinions which dissuaded them from trying.

My email gets Google alerts every time the words “low carb”, “low carb high fat” “LCHF” “ketogenic” or “keto” appear in web-based publications. Over the last six weeks I have been getting dozens of alerts each day. The surge is partly because of the annual January glut of diet and exercise-related stories and partly because keto is suddenly emerging from obscurity to become a hot (if sometimes misunderstood) trend. Three years ago when I started talking about “keto” nobody had a clue what I meant. Now more and more people have at least heard about it from someone they know.

Once you have experienced the positive effects, and feel the best you have in years, it tends to stick for a lifetime.

Some stories and reports have represented fantastic advances in legitimate recognition for low-carb ketogenic eating. For example, on January 16 the highly influential, peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which is read by a huge number of family physicians in North America, published a favourable review of uses of the ketogenic diet. Getting such information in front of the eyes of thousands of doctors heightens the chance that patients may now have their most trusted source for medical advice recommend a trial of keto eating. As many readers here know, just two weeks on LCHF can be eye-opening. While LCHF may not work for everyone, once you have experienced the positive effects, and feel the best you have in years, it tends to stick for a lifetime.

Better to operate on healthy organs than recommend keto? Insane!


Every publishing step forward is often linked with a step back. Published in the same JAMA journal edition and linked on the same JAMA internet page were two articles promoting bariatric gastric surgery — reducing the size of the stomach — for weight loss and diabetes reversal. One article compared two types of bariatric surgery; the other was a very positive patient hand out for sleeve gastroectomy — which essentially cuts the patient’s stomach in half. Neither article mentioned, anywhere, the possibility of encouraging patients to try a ketogenic diet first before resorting to the knife.

It astounds me and infuriates me that key medical organizations and experts will eagerly recommend invasive, risky surgical procedures, with potential serious complications, that remove part of a healthy, functioning organ, while balking at advising or supporting patients in at least a trial of keto eating. This is insanity.

Same old, same old


What is equally frustrating is when influential, well read publications convene the same old panels, touting the same old advice

What is equally frustrating is when influential, well read publications convene the same old panels, touting the same old advice “eat more fruit, vegetables and healthy grains” or “eat less/ exercise more” that we have been hearing for years — and that for most of us has proved completely ineffective. That is what US News & World Report did in January in its ranking of best diets, which rated the low-carb ketogenic diet as the very worst. Fortunately Nina Teicholz and Gary Taubes penned a great rebuttal in the Los Angeles Times, but the people who read the initial report may likely not see the well-argued takedown in a different publication.
One article, condemning the ketogenic diet, that particularly annoyed me was penned by a dietitian who helps clients with irritable bowel syndrome. “The ketogenic diet is just plain wrong” she said, going on to espouse her opinion that it would create serious digestive problems and increase the risk of colon cancer. This statement is not based on specific clear research but based on the assumption that the diet is always high in red meat — when it can, in fact, as we all know, be low or moderate in meat or even vegetarian. Even the associational research that high red meat consumption is carcinogenic has serious flaws. Yet she confidently claims: “The ketogenic diet is a textbook example of a high-cancer-risk dietary pattern.”

What contributed to my annoyance was that I had recently written a research-based article about IBS improvements on low-carb ketogenic eating, in which dramatic improvements were common. People with this embarrassing and socially isolating condition, which can constrain lives for decades, will usually know within two weeks whether a ketogenic diet helps their symptoms. What made me so cross is that this influential expert in IBS was needlessly scaring her readers away from a trial of a simple and potentially effective treatment without doing any in depth research.

Rant and scare


In a similar vein, an influential dietitian who writes for Good Housekeeping wrote in January “The ketogenic diet is B.S. for weight loss”. In her somewhat irrational rant she also raised the spectre of higher rates of cancer and osteoporosis, without any supporting research evidence, as reasons to stay away. I was dismayed that she was doing such a huge disservice for her readers, especially those with worsening diabetes, at real risk of amputations, blindness, heart attack, stroke and kidney failure. They are being scared off by unsubstantiated future cancer claims, and never get a balanced, fair assessment whether cutting carbohydrates and increasing fat may help them reverse diabetes and get off medication today.

Even writers who were ostensibly in favour of ketogenic eating gobsmacked me with their flawed or erroneous statements. One writer for Indian Vogue, wrote “Six keto recipes when you are on the go” but obviously never researched or tried the diet and was simply using a popular keyword like “keto” to get more web hits. She opened with this howler: “Low carbs mean low satiety levels, so it’s natural to feel ravenous when you’re going the keto way.” Anyone who has spent a single minute researching the diet, or even tried just four days of low-carb keto eating, knows that one of the greatest benefits is the loss of hunger and cravings. But then, when reading her recipes, she included honey, passion fruit and other non-keto ingredients so maybe she really was ravenous on her so-called “keto way.”

What makes me so frustrated about all of this misinformation is that I spent 30 years of my working life as a health writer in mainstream media. I know the pressures of the deadlines. I know the tendency to go to established “experts” in recognized academic or organizational roles, which so often tout the status quo. Over the course of three decades, I wrote dozens of articles on diet and exercise. But I always, always went to the research literature to do a search to see what was new, what was controversial, what might be changing.

Can no longer quote the official party line


Doing that three years ago led me to the low-carb ketogenic diet. It seemed so sensible, so amazing, and so revolutionary that I had to try it. I realized immediately that promoting low fat, fruits, grains and veggies no longer held sway. I rapidly improved my health, and my experience then spread to help improve the health of now an increasing number of my family and friends.

In fact, I no longer want to work for mainstream media because I refuse to call up diabetes or obesity organizations and get the official quote from a titular head who says, yet again, that people “need to eat less and move more.” I cannot do it anymore. I cannot contribute to the misinformation when I know it isn’t true.

There was a palpable resistance from my editors and publications, however, to accept story pitches from me that proposed a low-carb ketogenic story angle to a weight loss, diabetes or health story. They rejected my pitches. They didn’t want to stick their neck out with a new approach. They wanted, instead, to take the safe, old route until the old guard changed their tune. Mainstream media follows; it does not lead.

Five stages of keto eating


My anger surprised me. Why should I care? It struck me the other day that, just like Elizabeth Kubler Ross’s five stages of grief, there are five personal stages of the keto journey and I am on the fourth and fifth stage. Here they are:
  • Disbelief: Can it be true that this way of eating removes cravings, comes with no feelings of deprivation and still has you lose weight? Can it be true that it corrects metabolic issues and has you feeling great? How can we have been told for years to stay away from fat and fill up on grains and carbs?! I’m not sure about this, but I suppose I will try.
  • Elation: It is true! It is incredible! I feel so good! The weight is coming off almost without effort. My health issues are reversing! I am getting off my various medications. This is fantastic!
  • Personal promotion: I can’t stop talking about it. I must tell my friends and family. I must post pictures and comment on Facebook and Reddit. At parties I must tell anyone who will listen how great eating fat is!
  • Irritation/anger: How can major health organizations, governments, medical associations and other groups not be embracing low-carb keto eating? How can they still be peddling outdated information that is keeping people sick? How can they continue cutting off the feet of diabetics, or cutting away stomachs of the obese, but not investigating the use and rational of low-carb keto eating? How can the low-fat, calories in/out lies and misinformation still be proliferating? This is outrageous!
  • Advocacy: I must do my part to help spread the word wider than my personal circle. I must give my doctor credible and well-researched books and articles. I must help correct the misinformation. I will ignore the old guard and do my utmost to distribute good, accurate information far and wide.
The need for clear, calm but effective advocacy is what makes me so appreciative of Diet Doctor. Its daily collating of the best of low-carb ketogenic information and inspiration provides a credible and convincing forum for well-informed discussion and the sharing of cutting edge research.

It is up to us, the people whose lives have been irrevocably changed, to spread the word

We can’t rely, yet, on mainstream media and its columnists to distribute fair and balanced reports. So it is up to us, the people whose lives have been irrevocably changed, to spread the word and share important articles.
And as our numbers grow and grow, the so-called mainstream “experts” will eventually have to change. Until then they may raise the spectre of fear or promote out-of-date views, but we can remain calm, rational and carry on. When one’s health improves so hugely, mainstream media and its array of tired experts become much easier to ignore.


Anne Mullens

More


A keto diet for beginners

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Trying to conceive? Try the better baby diet of beef, butter & bacon

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The post Ignoring the mainstream myths about low-carb ketogenic eating appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 Science & health  Keto
New op-ed: The New Canada Food Guide needs to change in accordance with science

Diet Doctor
 
New op-ed: The New Canada Food Guide needs to change in accordance with science

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Too much is at stake when it comes to the current health crisis, to simply continue to promote obsolete and ineffective advice, argues a new op-ed in Vancouver Sun. The upcoming Canadian dietary guidelines – the first update in 10 years – can’t keep promoting a low-fat diet:

Vancouver Sun: Opinion: New Canada Food Guide: Why we must get it right this time

Earlier


The current health crisis and Canada’s food guide

Hundreds of Canadian doctors demand an end to the low-fat nutrition dogma

Dietary guidelines


  • Image/photo

    A global food revolution45:44Around the world, a billion people with obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance could benefit from low carb. So how can we make low carb simple for a billion people?

  • Image/photo

    A strategy to make low carb adoptable19:54How Drs. Rutherford and Bhardwaj work to make the health authorities adopt low-carb strategies.

  • Image/photo

    Nutrition Nuggets to Combat Conventional Dietary Advice45:06What are the seven common beliefs that are just myths, and that hold us back from understanding how to eat truly healthy foods?

  • Image/photo

    Why Our Dietary Guidelines Are Wrong16:01How can experts keep saying that butter is dangerous, when there's no scientific support left?

  • Image/photo

    Creating Change in Public Health17:20How is the organization Public Health Collaboration UK contributing to changing the dietary guidelines?

  • Image/photo

    "I Have Been Following the Wrong Advice!"16:39How Antonio Martinez finally managed to reverse his type 2 diabetes.

  • Image/photo

    Professor Noakes on Trial28:47Dr. Zoe Harcombe and Nina Teicholz were expert witnesses at the Tim Noakes trial back in October and this is a bird's-eye view of what went on at the trial.

  • Image/photo

    "Just Stop Demonizing Real Food"21:24Is saturated fat bad? What does science say? And if saturated fat is not dangerous, how long will it take for our guidelines to change?

  • Image/photo

    LCHF – Who Benefits Financially?37:12Who benefits financially from low carb?

  • Image/photo

    Should Dietary Fat Guidelines Have Been Introduced?33:54Should you fear butter? Or has the fear of fat been a mistake from the start? Dr. Harcombe explains.

  • Image/photo

    "Dietary Guidelines for Whom?"09:45It's time for a major change when it comes to dietary guidelines.

  • Image/photo

    Did the Introduction of the Dietary Guidelines Start the Obesity Epidemic?35:12Did the introduction of the dietary guidelines start the obesity epidemic?

  • Image/photo

    Helping People Learn Low Carb in Brazil12:07Rodrigo Polesso talks about his own health journey and gives his best tips for anyone looking to start eating a low-carb diet.

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    Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt23:06Has Sweden adopted low-carb dietary guidelines? Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt answers questions about the work we do at Diet Doctor and low-carb as a treatment for different conditions.

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    "Diabetes Is a Ticking Time Bomb"08:24Diabetes is a ticking time bomb. The problem is so major that government needs to take action through legislation.

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    How to Change the Way a Country Eats21:05How do you change the way a country eats? On a total budget of only $6,000? That’s the question Jayne Bullen answered at Low Carb USA 2016.

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    The Big Fat Fix1:19:34Donal O'Neill and Dr. Aseem Malhotra star in this excellent documentary about the failed low-fat ideas of the past and how to really get healthy.

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    How to Change the Way a Country Eats13:07How can we turn the epidemics of obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes around in a country?
The post New op-ed: The New Canada Food Guide needs to change in accordance with science appeared first on Diet Doctor.
 The food revolution  Science & health  Failed low-fat diets